What is my Credit Card Security Code?

The card security code is located on the back of MasterCard, Visa, Discover, Diners Club, and JCB credit or debit cards and is typically a separate group of three digits to the right of the signature strip.

Virtual terminals and payment gateways do not store the CVV2 code; therefore, employees and customer service representatives with access to these web-based payment interfaces, who otherwise have access to complete card numbers, expiration dates, and other information, still lack the CVV2 code. I had been using Discover for virtual numbers for years, but now do all my on-line transactions with my Bank of America virtual numbers. For your protection, we can only send your identification code to the phone number or email address we have on file. Cash advance Charge-off Maxed out.

Flip your card over and look at the signature box. You should see either the entire digit credit card number or just the last four digits followed by a special 3-digit .
If needed, you can request a new code by clicking the
The Card Security Code is an added security feature to help protect you against online fraud. The Card Security Code is the group of numbers immediately following your credit card number on the back of the card. These numbers are used by your credit card company to help prevent fraud.
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If needed, you can request a new code by clicking the
Why do I need an identification code?

How will this process work?

The card security code is located on the back of MasterCard, Visa, Discover, Diners Club, and JCB credit or debit cards and is typically a separate group of three digits to the right of the signature strip.

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According to Newcastle University, Mastercard stopped this sort of distributed guessing, but Visa did not. Follow NakedSecurity Follow duckblog.

Paul Ducklin is a passionate security proselytiser. That's like an evangelist, but more so! He lives and breathes computer security, and would be happy for you to do so, too.

I use this at Citi quite often. Another good idea is to set alerts for charges. I watched a retail watchdog type TV program recently talking about card security and they stated that Amazon do not ask for this as it helps them reduce risk of non-compliance to PCI DSS and due to their size the transaction cost placed upon them by their payment processor or acquirer due to the increase risk of fraud from not asking for the CVV was not enough to make them do otherwise.

Is this true and if so this would make me extremely worried about using them in future, irrespective of the fact that they would refund me any loss if the worst happened. If the only way you can trigger a purchase using your stored details is via some other sort of authenticated login, I suppose that is considered at least as safe as asking for the CVV. I only enter a user name and password on Amazon, no 2FA and they only have my PAN, expiry date and card type along with name and address.

There is no request for a security code whatsoever not even when i first signed up and not on return orders.

Apparently they are happy to pay higher transaction costs and higher liability insurance and happy to refund me should I report fraudulent activity and it is verified. Which OK fair enough but I think I would much prefer them to be pro active than reactive when it comes to card security. DG — Well said. We will need to send you an identification code via email, text, or phone call. Please ensure your contact information is accurate to avoid any interruptions while accessing your account.

There's no need to sign up; this is an automatic service for your added security and protection. You can update your email and text alert options within your Account Profile at any time.

For your protection, we can only send your identification code to the phone number or email address we have on file. If your contact information is different than what we have on file, please call our Customer Service at for help. Be sure to check your Junk or Spam folder in your email account.

You can also select a different method of delivery for a replacement identification code. You can use any of the identification codes you recently received. Remember, the codes are only valid for a limited time and will expire if you don't use it within a certain time period.

Yes, your identification code is temporary and will expire if you don't use it within a certain time period. If needed, you can request a new one by clicking the "Get New Code" button. Discover will not charge you a fee to send a text message with your identification code. However, you should contact your mobile service provider to determine their charges to you for receiving text messages on your mobile device if you're unsure about text messaging fees or data rates.

It can be called CVV, CV2, CVC, CSC or CCV, but you need to know where it is

Since your credit card security code is another tool to help protect your credit, be careful about sharing it over the phone and never share it in an email as this is not a secure method of communication. The Card Security Code is an added security feature to help protect you against online fraud. The Card Security Code is the group of numbers immediately following your credit card number on the back of the card. These numbers are used by your credit card company to help prevent fraud. It doesn’t matter what you call them – a card security code (CSC), card verification value (CVV or CV2), card verification code (CVC) or even a card code verification (CCV) – those three or four digits provide an additional measure of credit card security when you make purchases online, by mail or over the phone.